Racheal Cook:
Okay. Welcome everybody, to another segment of The CEO Confessions, here on Promote Yourself To CEO. I’m so excited to have my guest, Erica Courdae, join me today. She is one of my favorite ladies I have had the pleasure of meeting in the last year or so. She gives the best hugs on the planet. She is my go to diversity, equity, and inclusion coach.

Racheal Cook:
But what I love about Erica is, she has such an interesting background of being an entrepreneur herself. Starting in the beauty and the wedding industry. I am so excited to have her share her journey, and how she came to be a diversity, equity, and inclusion coach here with you today. Erica, thank-you so much for joining me.

Erica Courdae:
Thank-you for having me, Racheal. I’m like, “I do give good hugs”, and I like giving hugs, a lot. So I’ll take it.

Racheal Cook:
The best hugs. The best hugs. One of the things that I really wanted to bring you on the show to talk about, Erica, is you have been an entrepreneur for a very long time.

Erica Courdae:
It’s crazy to think about it. It’s been about, I think right now, because we’re in 2020. It’s been about 13 years.

Racheal Cook:
13 years, and you started in the beauty industry. Can you tell us a little bit about what your first business is, and what that looked like?

Erica Courdae:
Sure. Silver Immersion, I actually officially started it back in 2008. I’ve been a hair stylist now for over 20 years. For me, it was definitely an accidental entrepreneur kind of thing. In that it was something that I had been doing. People wanted to give me money for it, so I’m like, “All right. Apparently I have a business”.

Erica Courdae:
I started it, and back then it was so different. Because you didn’t need to have social media. You didn’t need to have all of this online presence. I had to create relationships, and have face to face actual time and interaction, and connection with people. I had a full fledged running, thriving business. Completely started it, and kept it going through the recession.

Erica Courdae:
When I hit a point a few years ago, where it was time for a rebrand. I felt like the colors in the logo just wasn’t working. But I also didn’t realize that, it was time for an ethics alignment. The things that we really focused on and supported, and were important cornerstones of what we did, weren’t standing out as much as I felt like they should. That was the fact that we were huge proponents for marriage equality.

Erica Courdae:
Seeing that certain types of beauty were really not focused on, or centered in the beauty industry, let alone the wedding industry, with women that were not getting married at 22. They were not a size two. They maybe were on their second marriage. There were blended families, in pretty much any way that you could think of. Interracial, religions, everything.

Erica Courdae:
I’m like, “This feels homogenous, and this isn’t okay”. I just really, I couldn’t be okay not making that more of a highlight. I started to really talk about it a lot more, and I made it a focal point when I did my rebrand. With not only the imagery, but also the verbiage, and just how I led with the purpose of it. The funny part was, I didn’t realize that that was what really planted the seeds, for what then became Erica Courdae. Because I finally realized that these were parts of me.

Racheal Cook:
This is what you were really, truly meant to do.

Erica Courdae:
Exactly.

Racheal Cook:
I love how you talk about this being an ethics and a value realignment. I think this is such an important conversation right now. Especially, it feels like, this past decade, the 2010s feels like a lot of things were bubbling up to the surface, and becoming topics that we’re talking about now more. Marriage equality. Me Too. Racial disparity. All of these different challenges are really more at the forefront, I feel, than ever before.

Racheal Cook:
It’s so interesting. Because I feel like prior to that, or at least when I was coming up in the world of business, it was very much church and state. You don’t talk about certain things. You don’t cause waves. You don’t bring up conversations that might be considered too political, or too religious, or too whatever.

Racheal Cook:
But now we’re seeing a huge shift. I think it’s so interesting, because small businesses are grappling with, “Well how do I lead with this? What if it gets a lot of backlash?”. What was it like when you started this whole rebrand, and then suddenly, your imagery and your verbiage and everything you’re saying is much more prominent, with your messaging about inclusion, and diversity of diversity in the brides and the families you were serving?

Erica Courdae:
The funny part about it is that, considering that I was in a beauty business, and I still have my salon, this is an environment where, especially with women, they come in. That 45 minutes while they’re sitting and letting their hair color process, they will drop everything. They will tell you their entire life story. Why this is terrible. How your mother in law is godawful. They will give you everything.

Erica Courdae:
Yet I remember being taught, “You don’t talk about religion. You don’t talk about politics. You don’t …”. It was this ingrained thought process of, “You don’t bring your whole self. These things don’t come”. Then when you’d be –

Racheal Cook:
“Not professional”, is what I was taught.

Erica Courdae:
Right.

Racheal Cook:
“Not professional if you share those opinions with other people”.

Erica Courdae:
Correct. But yet, then what happens in a business environment? Particularly when you are the entrepreneur and the business owner, and you realize that you are doing business with people on a regular basis, that stand for things that you can’t stand for. It just doesn’t work.

Erica Courdae:
I remember hitting a point, where I knew that it was very possible that I was going to lose business, by being upfront and honest about what we stood for. But I also didn’t want that business anymore. Because I didn’t want to take in money that meant that I had to leave a piece of my soul on the sideline along with it.

Erica Courdae:
It’s a very tough conversation to have, and a thing to do. When the entire purpose of starting a business, not a charity, is to make money. You have to begin to decide what the standard is for you. But is all money good money? What that looks like. How you navigate that for your particular brand. I just, I found that it wasn’t okay to literally stand for something, with the silent complicity. That not only did it affect people’s lives, but this is supposed to be a happy moment. I was facilitating somebody else saying, “No, you can’t have this”.

Racheal Cook:
Yeah. I love that you have this phrase that you say all the time, called voting with your dollars. I think this is so powerful. Because we tend to forget that we aren’t on this island. We are part of this ecosystem of money flowing in a lot of different directions. We actually have a lot of resources that we can use, to facilitate change, or to force change. Create change.

Racheal Cook:
I’d love for you to talk a little bit about how you started voting with your dollars, as a business owner.

Erica Courdae:
As a business owner, I think one of the first places to look, even if you’re a company of one, is almost supply chain things. What are the services that you as an individual are buying into, supporting? What are the actual tangible items that you’re purchasing? Where are they coming from? If you are using a VA, or someone like that, are you choosing someone that is stateside, versus outsourcing it because it’s cheap labor?

Erica Courdae:
I think one of those really easy ones that I always remember to this day, and I kept this email, because to me it was absolutely brilliant, was the company ConvertKit. They changed their name at one point to Seva. They were like, “We did all this research, and we thought it was great”. Then people came back and said, “This has some racial connotations to it. It’s very culturally based, and I don’t know if you realized it”.

Erica Courdae:
They got a lot of backlash for it. What they did was, the CEO wrote an amazing letter about, “We did the research. We thought we knew, but we didn’t. This was what we heard. This is why it wasn’t okay. This is what we’re committed to going forward. We were wrong. We acknowledge that. We apologize for it. This is what we want to do. We are changing our name back, and we appreciate everyone that was open enough to tell us what we did wrong, and to give us the opportunity to correct it”.

Erica Courdae:
They spoke up about not only where they had made a misstep. But yet, what to do with it next. They gave the business owner connotation and context around why investing in them made sense. Because they were an ethical company.

Racheal Cook:
They were, even if they made the misstep, willing to own up to it, and engage in the whole conversation. Which I feel like, this is something that I’m seeing a lot. I feel like the last couple of years, I’ve been really making a conscious effort to educate myself, and to break down the unconscious biases. All of the things that are so entrenched, that we don’t even realize we’re coming to the table with. I’m trying to unravel all of these things personally.

Racheal Cook:
Because I’m sitting in the privilege of being a white woman in America. I know I inherently come to the table with a lot of that. I follow, because of the type of clients I serve, I tend to serve so many spiritual entrepreneurs. People in the wellness community. There’s a lot of controversy right now, about everything from appropriation of other cultures, to just the whitewashing of a lot of the messaging that is out there right now.

Racheal Cook:
It’s very interesting to me, that this is all coming together in this interesting mix right now. Because for a long time, that’s been something that people didn’t talk about. Nobody really brought it to the forefront.

Racheal Cook:
But I love that you’re bringing up these conversations. I love following more people who are bringing up these conversations. Because I think it’s so important, if we as business owners are being inspired, or learning from other cultures that we’re owning up to if we overstep. Or if we say something wrong. Or if we hurt people. Even if we didn’t intend to, the hurt is still there.

Racheal Cook:
I love that you have this focus on helping people navigate these tough conversations with your DEI consulting. Can you share a little bit about what that has looked like? As you’ve been transitioning, over the last few years really. I mean, it’s been a while since you’ve really been the person to go to when you’re grappling with these things. What kind of conversations are you having with entrepreneurs right now, around diversity, equity, and inclusion?

Erica Courdae:
The funny part was, I felt like last year, for example, was a lot of getting people to a place that they were willing to take imperfect action, and step into the imperfect allyship. What I began to notice, the last few months of the year, there was a big turn in people feeling like, “Okay. Now what do I do? I am learning. I have this knowledge. I have this base. I have this platform, and this business that I can utilize for good. For change”.

Erica Courdae:
It’s getting people to this point, that they’re really wanting to step into action. I think that because it really got through, getting people to begin to talk about, what are implicit biases? Do you realize what they are, and how they’re showing up? Do you realize, like you said, intent versus impact? What are some of these things that maybe you don’t notice, because they’re not meant for you? But beginning to see where they’re showing up. Seeing where they’re showing up in life, let alone how they then pop up as these topics, and these points within business.

Erica Courdae:
From there, it’s gotten people to this place. That they’re like, “I want to question what my normal is. I want to begin to step into how I can have this be a part of the brand, ethics, values, and culture. Where am I now? Where do I want to change this? Where can I make it known what I stand for? In a way that doesn’t feel like, ‘I put this photo in here, and it’s got a black hand in it. I have the one black person that I’ve ever met in this photo that I keep using'”.

Erica Courdae:
It’s getting people to not take it so seriously, to the point that they’re not willing to do it. But to take it seriously enough to know that not acting isn’t an option.

Racheal Cook:
That is one thing that I really felt strongly about. I think a lot of people were confusing for a while, tokenism with being an ally.

Erica Courdae:
Yes.

Racheal Cook:
I saw this coming up, no joke, when people were getting ready to do photo shoots. Or finding imagery, and literally being like, “Well I need more diversity in the people in my photos”. I’m like, “But, hold on. Are you actually getting diversity in your clientele? Or is that just trying to trick people into saying, ‘I believe in diversity’?”.

Racheal Cook:
It’s been interesting, because I think a lot of people don’t realize that that’s more of a tokenism thing, than being a true ally.

Erica Courdae:
It is. It’s like business cat fishing. But I think for a long time, there were a lot of people that felt like, “Well how else am I supposed to do it?”.

Racheal Cook:
Exactly, exactly.

Erica Courdae:
It’s like, “If I don’t do it, then it can’t happen. But then if I do it, then it’s wrong”. It’s like, “But you haven’t even started to acknowledge why you wanted to do this. Why this matters, and why it’s actually a part of your business, and not just something that you want to be a part of your imagery. To say that you did it. Or to keep you from feeling as though you’re something that you don’t want to be called, or claimed. Exclusionary, racist, or anything else”.

Erica Courdae:
“But I have a black person”. That’s not the answer to that.

Racheal Cook:
Yeah, exactly. Well one thing that you really shared with me, in a workshop that you hosted, I guess it was last year that I attended. Was really checking where you are getting inspiration from. I find that even in the world of social media, we don’t realize how siloed we get, in who we’re following.

Racheal Cook:
I’ve done this in a couple different areas for diversity, equity, and inclusion for myself. Challenging myself to find new pockets of people to learn from, and to give me insight and ideas. Everything from, I realized in my feed, I was only watching women entrepreneurs who were predominantly white, or looked white. I specifically spent time going, “Okay. Who are the women of color? Who are the women outside of this one small little circle, who are also teaching business? Who are also involved in marketing? Who are also involved in branding?”.

Racheal Cook:
There are so many amazing women out there. I just wasn’t seeing them, because I was in my own little silo. Now I’m following a whole group of women I’d never known about before.

Racheal Cook:
What’s really interesting is, to me, on social media, we don’t realize how the algorithm actually forces that divide. Because especially if you’re doing something like running ads on Facebook, if I upload an email list, or say, “I just want to target people who look like my existing audience”, it’s just going to give me back more of what I have. If I’m not asking it for diversity, it’s not going to give me diversity. It’s just going to continue to show me one homogenous group over and over and over again.

Racheal Cook:
I found that exercise that you gave to be really interesting. Because I went out there, and specifically looked for women of color in business. I was looking for women doing social justice work, because I feel really passionate about that.

Racheal Cook:
I also looked for a lot of women who were doing body positivity work. This was on the recommendation of a health coach who was like, “Stop following all these women who are just making you feel terrible about yourself. Here’s some beautiful big women to follow, who are following this body positivity message”. I was like, “Holy crap. Look how much we can change what we are inputting”. When you change what you input, it really helps you to change your perspective in so many ways.

Erica Courdae:
Well, and it helps you to pick up on those nuances, that maybe you wouldn’t know. Because that doesn’t tend to be your particular lot in life. That’s not how you were raised. That’s not your family of origin, so to speak. I think it’s important, when it comes to, what is healthy to you? What entertains you? What is it that feeds or fuels you? What creates the stories that make your normal? Being able to have that context with that.

Erica Courdae:
Because with you being in business, it can be very difficult for someone that looks like me. That we’re to come to someone’s page, and they don’t see anyone that looks like them. It’s like, “Well this could be helpful”. But then you don’t feel welcome. What do you then do? For you to have such a passion for working on that disparity. Of how much money women of color entrepreneurs are bringing in, and being able to stand behind that with who is actually showing up when you have your CEO retreats.

Erica Courdae:
Who is it that you’re networking with? Who was in your network? That you have on your podcast? These things are showcasing your beliefs, ethics, and values. That’s where I think a lot of people miss the mark. Of, “Yeah, I do these things”. But do you? That’s why it’s important, when you’re identifying your client. Whether it’s the person you want to work with, or the person that you want to hire. Going deeper than that, what are their ethics? What makes them tick? What matters to them? Does that actually align with what you believe in? Do you even know what you truly believe in?

Racheal Cook:
I love that you just brought this up. Because I know you and another friend of ours, India Jackson, you’re putting on a workshop. It might have already gone live by the time this episode goes out. Sorry guys. But I was reading everything you were talking about in this workshop, about finding your ideal client. I think this is also a place where implicit bias comes into play, and we don’t even realize it.

Racheal Cook:
Because so often, when you sit down with anybody in marketing or branding, and they’re like, “Who is your ideal client? What do they look like?”. They start with those demographic pieces. Which is great if you’re trying to find a homogenous group of people in a Facebook ad. But in so many ways, it doesn’t serve the business very well. It also doesn’t serve showcasing who you really care for.

Racheal Cook:
I’d love you to talk a little bit more about, when you’re thinking through helping people find their ideal client, how do you help them identify those values? How do you help them identify that information, that will then attract people to them? But really show people that they’re trying to be an ally. Or that they’re trying to show up in alignment with these specific values?

Erica Courdae:
I actually, it’s funny. Because I sent out a gift to my email list over the holidays. It was a company culture journaling workbook. It really asked some questions, to get you to dig deeper. To first identify what that is. Because I think before you can go outward facing with it, you have to first identify what it is that matters to you. What are the things that you want to bring into your business? Because I do think it’s important to acknowledge that we are not our business fully. You don’t have to dump all of your inside fully into your business.

Erica Courdae:
But what are the things that are non-negotiables? What does matter to you? How are you voting with your dollars? How is it that you want to connect with your clients, when it comes to what matters? When you’re able to first identify those things, you can then go through and see, how does this happen? How does this go into my hiring practices? How does this go into, just simply beginning to curate that pool, that you want to pull possible candidates from?

Erica Courdae:
How are you then speaking to your ideal client? What matters to them? How is it that you can identify that ideal client, by deciding something more than just their age, their sex, what magazine they read, how old they are? How is it that you can decide what is the connecting thread among them? That is more about, what matters to them? What moves them? What are the things that they absolutely just won’t stand for?

Erica Courdae:
From there, you can begin to bring that into your imagery. Into your messaging. Into the culture that you want to create, if you have a group or a community. If you are putting together conferences and things like this. If you are doing summits. You want to really be clear on who you’re speaking to, and what it is that you want to foster. Then you can figure out the how.

Erica Courdae:
But if you don’t start with that why, literally that Simon Sinek thing, you really can’t do any of it. You have to first get clear on that.

Racheal Cook:
Yeah. It’s a lot of hard work to get that level of clarity. I think this is one of those things that, what I really want people to take away is, one, it does take effort. This isn’t, you do a quick little values exercise and you’ve magically aligned everything. It’s ongoing work. Every day, I am facing decisions, where I have to go back to, “Okay. Is this truly in alignment with how I want to show up in my business?”.

Racheal Cook:
For example, not too long ago I was invited to participate in a summit, with some pretty well known speakers on it. But as she was telling me all the people who were going to be speaking, I was like, “There’s no women of color in this. Everybody here is white”. I asked her, I was like, “I’ve made a commitment to making sure that if I participate in something, I’m helping to elevate, or be an ally to diverse voices. I want to know, do you have any women of color? Or other non-traditional groups that are speaking here?”.

Racheal Cook:
She was like, “Well, kind of. I have one person coming on as a diversity equity consultant”. I was like, “But anyone else? Because they also have a lot of other expertise. This isn’t the only topic that they talk about”. They were shocked. They were shocked, and so I turned them down. Instead, I sent them a list of about five other people who were LGBTQ, or who were women of color, or non-binary, or whatever it is.

Racheal Cook:
I was just like, “I really feel like my place would be better filled by this person”. To me, that’s one of the small little decisions I’ve been making, on a regular basis now as these opportunities come in. Where am I aligning myself? How do my values show up? Not just by what I say, or by what’s on my website. But the actions that I’m taking, every single day.

Erica Courdae:
But that’s why it’s so important, and I’m glad that you mentioned it. That this is not one and done. This is ongoing work. Even with wherever you are today, there’s still going to be evolutionary actions within it. It’s important to have those touch points. Whether it’s something that you do quarterly, biannually. But going through and being able to say, the same way you’re going to check any of your other business metrics. “Where is this? How am I feeling about it? What am I saying yes to? Why am I saying yes to it?”.

Erica Courdae:
I think that that’s important. Because there are definitely things that, there was one summit that I said yes to last year that, I didn’t do it because I felt as though the diversity was truly being fostered. I said yes to it because I chose to be a disruptor, and it wasn’t there. I’m like, “You need to have this message brought in here. I don’t care if there’s one person that listens. I have to shake things up”.

Erica Courdae:
I think that there are definitely times where, whether it’s a community, whether it’s a conference. Whether it’s a mastermind. There are times that you’re like, “I don’t know that I want to be here, but I’m not sure why”. That’s why having that understanding of what your ethics are, you can clearly say, “Okay. I know why this feels funny. Now I’ve given myself some alternatives on what to do”.

Erica Courdae:
What you did was actually, I would ask people to do that. Because very often, there’s not enough voices there. I did a podcast interview recently, where the person was just like, “We didn’t have it for a conference. Then when the one person that I did have that was a female of color backed out, I then didn’t know what to do”. I’m like, “It’s already too late, if now you’re at that place and you need it”.

Erica Courdae:
You need to begin fostering these connections, and increasing where you’re taking in information, and who you think is an expert, long before.

Racheal Cook:
That goes back to what I was saying. Making sure you’re not just following a homogenous group of people. You need to be actually looking for experts across the spectrum of diversity.

Erica Courdae:
Exactly.

Racheal Cook:
I think this is really important, what you said. Being a disruptor. Because I often feel this way, just as a woman in general. A lot of events and conferences and speaking opportunities I’ve had in the past, being the only woman on the stage. There were no people of color on the stage. That’s a challenge that I face as an advocate for women in general. Often the places where I feel like I could speak, I feel frustrated. Because then you feel like, “Well they just want me here, just because I’m the solo woman”.

Racheal Cook:
But I love the shift into, “Well I’m going to be the disruptor, showing up in the room”.

Erica Courdae:
So that way, when you go in, if you are the minority, then you can speak from your expertise. Yet also draw attention to the fact that you are not the only person in your field that’s an expert. There is a lack. There is a space here, where there is some work that needs to be done to really be more inclusive, and to truly show the vast space of people that are amazing, that don’t look like white, middle aged males, for example. We can open this up a little bit.

Erica Courdae:
I think it’s important to speak from a place that isn’t limited to that, yet also acknowledged the fact that you are here. Because of the fact that it needed to be brought to the table.

Racheal Cook:
Yeah. I love that. I just know that these conversations are, this is what’s going to change what happens for our daughters. The challenges that we are facing. The wage inequality, and the lack of women in leadership. Only two percent of women businesses are getting VC funding. All of these things start to change when we all start showing up more, and advocating for each other more.

Racheal Cook:
I’m really passionate about this topic, and I’ll be continuing to do my own work in this world. In this space. But also, supporting people like you, who are truly holding the space for us to have these conversations, and grapple with these things.

Racheal Cook:
As your business has been taking off in the last couple years, I think the last few months, you’ve done more speaking and more interviews, and more workshops than I’ve ever seen you do before. I’m curious, because you’re still running the beauty business. You still own that. Now you’re doing this diversity, equity, and inclusion consulting. You’re traveling and speaking. You’re hosting workshops.

Racheal Cook:
You’re doing so many things. How are you making all of this work? It’s so much, all at the same time. I feel like you’re hitting everything at, the timing of this is just, it’s launching you very quickly into this next phase.

Erica Courdae:
I feel like this is going to be a year, number one, there’s been a lot of, this doesn’t necessarily matter. So I’m not going to make it matter. Really saying that, “This isn’t essential”. Or, “This isn’t something that I have to do, or should do”. Big air quotes on that, because that’s the outside noise, has been helpful. Being able to do it in a way that works for me.

Erica Courdae:
One of the big pushes for me this year is being able to fill out my support team. Because I am, by no means, under any false pretense that I can do everything. That’s a lie, and I am not willing to face burnout head on, by even remotely trying to buy into that. Because I still do want to be present in my life, and I can’t do that if I’m fully consumed with everything professionally that needs to be done. Or that, “Oh, what did I not do?”, that never really shuts off, or never goes away.

Erica Courdae:
Really identifying, what is the support that I need? How can I have that space filled? But also even then, that whole, “Does it need to be delegated? Or does this just need to be deleted?”. Because if nobody needs to do it, I don’t need to pay anybody else to do it. That’s not the smartest money decision either. So yeah, it’s doing that. But it’s really dialing into my intuition, and hearing when something does or doesn’t go good. Because it’s okay to say no.

Erica Courdae:
Being able to hear where my body’s like, “Okay, you have done enough. You now need to shut off. You need to go eat. You need a day off”. Whatever that thing is. Listening to myself, and honoring when my body has said, “What you are doing is not black and white number, surface level”. There’s no emotional context to it. Being able to realize when my body, and that empath piece of me has said, “I now need to go recharge. I need a dark room with no other people in it”.

Erica Courdae:
Whatever that calling is, actually answering and listening. Because I don’t think that I can show up and support anybody else, if I haven’t started here.

Racheal Cook:
That’s one of the things that I love about you the most. You talk so much about, when you’re doing any type of work where you’re providing a container for other people, to do their inner work, to go through a transformational process, you have to put yourself first. You have to have that strong foundation of support. Otherwise, you’re constantly pouring from an empty cup, instead of giving people the overflow from a cup that’s already full. I think that’s so important, that you have that message in the work that you’re doing especially.

Erica Courdae:
It’s funny you say that. Because I have a friend who has just this amazing level of, “I deserve it, and why not?”. I’ve picked up this connotation of, I’ve always felt like I have to put my oxygen mask on first. But instead of looking at things now from the glass half full, or glass half empty, I really like this thought process of, “This isn’t my glass”. Simply looking for the one that is actually, “Wait, that’s not mine. Where’s mine?”. That’s been a huge thing for me.

Racheal Cook:
I love that. I love that. Well Erica, thank-you so much for joining me today. As we start to wrap up, you’ve been on this amazing journey, and have brought so much value to me and to my business. I so respect you in the work that you have done in the world.

Racheal Cook:
I want to close out by asking you, what does being the CEO mean to you, in the context of you and your business?

Erica Courdae:
I have to set an example. I have to show by doing. I have to be honest. I have to be upfront with my imperfection, and my moments of evolution for myself. I have to give people the space to say and do and be what they need to do, in order to show up as their most powerful, and of service self to others. As well as to themselves. I have to start with that here.

Erica Courdae:
I have to be whole. I have to be full. I have to be focused. I have to be driven. But I have to be me, and I have to be human.

Racheal Cook:
Thank-you so much. I love love love that definition of CEO. I just appreciate you so much, and your leadership. Thank-you so much for joining us. Where can people find more about you, and follow you online?

Erica Courdae:
Website is ericacourdae.com. Handle is all the same on Instagram and LinkedIn and Facebook. It is @ericacourdae. My podcast is Pause On the Play, where we have these unfiltered conversations. It now has a website, and a whole brand of its own. It even has Instagram and Twitter. That is all pauseontheplay.com.

Racheal Cook:
I highly recommend Pause On the Play. It’s always in my earbuds, as I’m listening every single week on your conversations. They’ve provided so much value to me. Thank-you so much.

Erica Courdae:
Thank-you.

Racheal Cook:
I’ll catch everybody in the next episode of Promote Yourself To CEO. Thank-you, thank-you.

Erica Courdae:
Thank-you.


Show Links

Listen to the Full Episode Right Here

Erica Courdae’s Website for Diversity Equity and Inclusion Coaching

Pause on the Play Podcast & Community

The DIY Company Culture Journaling Workbook